Saturday February 17, 2018 - Es el 17 de febrero, 2018. Es sábado

WebQuest: Evaluation

Your projects and presentations will be evaluated according to these rubrics:

Historical essay rubric

Level Criteria
4
• Well-developed thesis directly addressing the topic.
• Persuasive analysis of the topic, addressing all parts of the topic; analysis demonstrates thorough understanding of all sides of a question (as appropriate).
• Outstanding grasp of general historical issues raised by topic.
• Numerous specific examples demonstrate detailed knowledge of relevant history.
• Extremely well organized, with a clear introduction, argument, and conclusion.
• Well written in appropriate standard English; few grammatical errors or colloquialisms.
3
• Clear thesis addressing the topic.
• Good analysis of the topic, addressing most parts of the topic; analysis demonstrates understanding of all sides of a question (as appropriate), though may be unevenly developed.
• Good grasp of general historical issues raised by topic.
• Several specific examples demonstrate good knowledge of relevant history.
• Well organized, with an introduction, argument, and conclusion.
• Clearly written in appropriate standard English; some grammatical errors or colloquialisms.
2
• Thesis indicates some aspect of the topic; more a restatement of than a point about the topic.
• Analysis of the topic, addressing most parts of the topic; analysis adequate but unevenly developed.
• Some grasp of general historical issues raised by topic, though some significant issues may be omitted.
• Some specific examples demonstrate knowledge of relevant history; some clearly relevant examples omitted.
• Contains at least two of the following: introduction, argument, and conclusion; organization may be somewhat unclear.
• Understandable, but contains several grammatical errors or colloquialisms.
1
• No discernible thesis and/or serious misunderstanding of the topic.
• Descriptive rather than analytical; marginally related to the topic; significant logical gaps.
• Little grasp of general historical issues raised by topic.
• Few and/or erroneous specific examples demonstrate little knowledge of relevant history.
• Poorly organized: no clear introduction, argument, or conclusion.
• Pattern of grammatical errors and/or inappropriate colloquialisms.
Developed by John I. Brooks at Fayetteville State University

Presentation rubric

 
1
2
3
4
 

Organi-
zation

Audience cannot understand presentation because there is no sequence of information. Audience has difficulty following presentation because student jumps around. Student presents information in logical sequence which audience can follow. Student presents information in logical, interesting sequence which audience can follow.  
Subject Knowledge Student does not have grasp of information; student cannot answer questions about subject. Student is uncomfortable with information and is able to answer only rudimentary questions. Student is at ease with expected answers to all questions, but fails to elaborate. Student demonstrates full knowledge (more than required) by answering all class questions with explanations and elaboration.  
Graphics Student uses superfluous graphics or no graphics Student occasionally uses graphics that rarely support text and presentation. Student's graphics relate to text and presentation. Student's graphics explain and reinforce screen text and presentation.  
Mechanics Student's presentation has four or more spelling errors and/or grammatical errors. Presentation has three misspellings and/or grammatical errors. Presentation has no more than two misspellings and/or grammatical errors. Presentation has no misspellings or grammatical errors.  
Eye Contact Student reads all of report with no eye contact. Student occasionally uses eye contact, but still reads most of report. Student maintains eye contact most of the time but frequently returns to notes. Student maintains eye contact with audience, seldom returning to notes.  
Elocution Student mumbles, incorrectly pronounces terms, and speaks too quietly for students in the back of class to hear. Student's voice is low. Student incorrectly pronounces terms. Audience members have difficulty hearing presentation. Student's voice is clear. Student pronounces most words correctly. Most audience members can hear presentation. Student uses a clear voice and correct, precise pronunciation of terms so that all audience members can hear presentation.  
      Total Points:  

Developed by Information Technology Evaluation Services, NC Department of Public Instruction

Back to last page
Conclusion

 

© 2002-2010 SantamariaProductions
Antonio Santamaría
e-mail
Maestro de español en Wilson High School, Long Beach, CA
4400 E. 10th Street, Long Beach, California, 90804 - 562 433-0481 Ext. 6857

LBUSD, Wilson Classical High School disclaimer

Use of material on this web site - Uso del material en este web site